17 May 2013

The Art of Giving @ Shalini Ganendra Fine Art

To comprehend life, one observes death.  A doctor has the opportunity to understand both phenomena, especially when one is the pioneer organ transplantation surgeon Sir Roy Calne.  Since an encounter with Scottish painter and patient John Bellany, whom gave the good doctor painting lessons, Dr. Roy has pursued his interest in art with similar vigour, as he does with expanding new insights into graft rejection.  This skill has come in handy in helping calm anxieties in patients, especially children, when he offers to draw or sketch them.

Nude Kneeling from Behind (2005)

Possessing a deep knowledge of the human anatomy, has evidently helped Roy the artist in drawing figurative works.  The charcoal 'Nude Kneeling from Behind' depicts a rather crude position, but its shading is spot-on in creating volume.  The pastel 'Model Study II' takes advantage of its medium to draw unnatural yet beautiful colours on a bare back.  The watercolour '"Toti Bird", Cuba' has an exotic bird taking up one third of the horizontal space, its remaining area occupied by a hibiscus mat, and a disproportionately drawn nude.  'Butterfly Tummy' is the most beautiful painting on display, where bruise-like colours and scrawny arms, depict a fragility in the model's confident pose.

Butterfly Tummy (1999)

Perhaps seeking an appreciation of life's beauty in a sterile environment, Dr. Roy also loved painting flowers.  'Trailing Flowers in Blue Vase' is exemplary of his art methods - colourful, sketch-like, with simple but precise shading.  No surprises that his first sculpture was a liver, Roy's bronze works resembles Degas in crystallising a human action, his ballet and football figures defined right in the middle of a motion.  This exhibition showcases a comprehensive collection in different media, where upon surveying, becomes obvious that this surgeon not only has the ability to recover one's physical pain, but also to enrich one's spiritual well-being.

Flower paintings + bronze sculptures @ SGFA

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